Sep
26
to Sep 29

ECOFILM ALL FEST PASS

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Join us for the whole four-day festival, Sept. 26 - 29, by purchasing an EcoFilm All-Fest pass for only $70 (a 30% discount off full price.) Our festival pass gets you admission to all films, panel discussions and to our opening night party! Festival passes on sale now through 9/28. Individual tickets and festival passes can be purchased online and at the theater box office.

Festival passes: $70


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Sep
26
7:00 PM19:00

FESTIVAL OPENING NIGHT: NATURE FOR ALL

An evening of short films featuring a diversity of ways a diversity of people connect with nature.

Programmed in support of the upcoming voter bond measure, Nature For All.

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THE MAN OF THE TREES

Directed by Andrea Trivero. Italy & Burkina Faso, 19 mins, PNW premiere

Daniel Balima is a senior horticulturist from Tenkodogo, a small Sub-Saharan African town in Burkina Faso. As a child he fell ill with polio leaving him without the use of his legs, walking on his hands. Yet he has given life to more than a million trees. Because of the drought in his country, he dreams of planting another million.

Photo: Shoog McDaniel

Photo: Shoog McDaniel

BODIES LIKE OCEANS

Directed by Kat Cory. US, 13 mins, PNW filmmaker

A dreamy portrait of photographer Shoog McDaniel, a self-described queer fat southern freak, whose work with fat bodies in nature transgresses reality. From mountain-fed waterfalls to the clear blue and weightless world under the surface of a natural spring, this film is about finding beauty in new places.

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OUR TRAILS TOO

Directed by Liz Haan and Emilia Quinto. US, 31 mins, PNW filmmakers

 In one of the whitest states in the USA, a queer African American woman disrupts the outdoor adventurer stereotype.

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ROCKY INTERTIDAL ZONES

Directed by Irene Tejaratchi Hess, US, 3 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmaker

 A six year old boy explores the rocky intertidal zones of the Oregon Coast. He brings along prehistoric creatures, art materials, and a small tank which inspire musings about ancient and present day life.

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OREGON WILD: A NEW TRADITION

Directed by Anny Gutierrez. US, 2 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmaker

 A daughter continues her mother’s legacy of love for Oregon’s wild places.

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GIANTS

Directed by Luz Carasa. US, 27 mins, PNW filmmaker

During 2015, Everett Custom Homes purchased a property in Portland’s Eastmoreland Neighborhood. On the lot stood three giant sequoias, which the developer planned to cut down. "Giants" details the efforts and challenges neighbors of Eastmoreland confronted in their attempts to save these unique trees. The film brings a fresh look into local activism and the importance of community organizing.

Filmmakers in attendance.

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Admission to film screening includes admission to festival opening night party at The Magnolia.



Special guests: Oregon Wild, Oregon Film, The Intertwine Alliance, KBOO Community Radio

Sponsored by: Oregon Film, Oregon Wild, KBOO Community Radio, HydroFlask

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Sep
27
6:30 PM18:30

DAMMED TO EXTINCTION

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Directed by Michael Peterson.

US, 51 mins, Oregon film premiere, PNW filmmaker

For eons, a one-of-a-kind population of killer whales has hunted Chinook salmon along the Pacific Coast of the United States. For the last 40 years, renowned whale scientist Ken Balcomb has closely observed them. He’s familiar with a deadly pattern - as salmon numbers plummet, orcas starve. The solution, says Balcomb, is getting rid of four fish-killing dams 500 miles away on the largest tributary to what once was the largest Chinook producing river on earth. Studying whales is science. Removing dams is politics. Defiantly mixing the two, says Balcomb, has become the most important work of his storied career. Meanwhile, the race to extinction for salmon and orcas speeds up, nipping at the heels of the plodding, clumsy pace of political change in the Pacific Northwest, where dams and hydropower are king.

Screening with:

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SCAPEGOAT: THE CORMORANTS OF EAST SAND ISLAND

Directed by Trip Jennings, Balance Media

US, 9 mins, PNW filmmakers

This film documents the US Government's reckless and relentless killings of Double-crested Cormorants on East Sand Island at the mouth of the Columbia River. This colony was once the largest cormorant nesting colony in the world. The justification for killing cormorants was to prevent them from eating federally listed salmon, however the killings caused the collapse of the colony and moved many cormorants upriver where they now eat more salmon than before the killings took place.

Filmmakers from both films in attendance

Tour the Orca Oracle Bus - parked outside of our theater before and after the show!

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Special guests: 

Portland Audubon and The Orca Oracle Bus

Sponsored by:  Joan and Paul Sher


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Sep
27
9:00 PM21:00

RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: CODA

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RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: CODA

Directed by Stephen Nomura Schible

Japan, 1 hr 42 mins

From techno-pop stardom to Oscar-winning film composer, the evolution of Ryuichi Sakamoto's music has coincided with his life journeys. An eminent film composer (MERRY CHRISTMAS, MR. LAWRENCE, THE LAST EMPEROR, THE REVENANT) Sakamoto became an iconic figure in Japan's social movement against nuclear power following the Fukishima nuclear facility disaster. The film captures Sakamoto as he returns to music following a cancer diagnosis, while his haunting awareness of life crises leads to a resounding new masterpiece. RYUICHI SAKAMOTO: CODA is an intimate portrait of the artist, the man and what inspires his work.


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Sep
28
2:00 PM14:00

HIKE THE DIVIDE: A CONVERSATION ABOUT CLIMATE ACTION ON THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

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HIKE THE DIVIDE: A CONVERSATION ABOUT CLIMATE ACTION ON THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

Directed by Connor DeVane

US, 1 hr 22 mins, PNW filmmaker

Self-described “jaded millennial” Connor DeVane, treks 2,700 miles from Canada to Mexico on the CDT as he seeks hope in the face of climate breakdown. A physical journey through environments both harsh and breathtakingly beautiful, this film shares the stories of the community activists and problem solvers working on a spectrum of approaches to climate action, including grassroots community organizing, land regeneration to store CO2 in soil, non-violent civil disobedience and more.

Connor's journey intersects with a host of diverse and powerful voices united in not only picking us up off the floor, but also to shoving us out the door to build a better future.

Filmmaker in attendance

Screening with:

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WHERE LIFE BEGINS

Directed by Katie Schuler

Canada, 10 mins, Oregon premiere, PNW filmmaker

Along the Arctic Coast, at the northmost point on American soil, we explore the inseparable bond between a Gwich’in mother and her child, a caribou mother and her calf, the sacred and fragile moments after birth and the importance of protecting the place "Where Life Begins".

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Sponsored by Crag Law Center


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Sep
28
4:00 PM16:00

FILM SHORTS: REBIRTH

Four short films about the regenerative power of nature.

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THE SOUND OF A WILD SNAIL EATING

Directed by Elisabeth Tova Bailey

US, 15 mins, PNW premiere

When a woman is bedridden by a mysterious pathogen, a forest snail unexpectedly takes up residence on her nightstand. Together, the woman and snail share an intimate journey of survival and resilience. Their captivating and graceful explorations expand the boundaries of the bedroom. Adapted from the award-winning nonfiction memoir of the same title. Featuring the voice of Daryl Hannah.

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REWILDING A MOUNTAIN

Director Trip Jennings, Producer Sara Quinn

US, 27 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmakers

The sagebrush sea is a landscape of stark beauty and captivating wildlife, yet rapid desertification and extractive industries threaten this vast basin. But at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in Southeastern Oregon, a different story unfolds. New aspen explode alongside thriving creeks, migratory birds travel thousands of miles to nest in willow branches and even the endangered sage grouse seem to be recovering in the uplands. This film unravels an unsettling controversy that challenged the core identity of the West and follows a team of scientists who ask the question: what happened here?

At a moment when public lands are under attack, fresh water is becoming increasingly scarce and climate change demands severe action, Hart Mountain may serve as a lesson deeply needed, if we’re willing to listen.

Filmmakers in attendance

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FOR AYAN

Director Zach Putnam

US, 4 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmaker

Farah and her family have a tree planting tradition in memory of their daughter Ayan.

Filmmaker in attendance

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BECOMING FOREST TREES

Directed by Ran Levy-Yamamori

Israel and Japan, 27 mins., US premiere

Japanese Zen Buddhist priest Genpou Chisaka has a deep love and respect for nature and is reviving native Japanese Satoyama nature through alternative burials. Chisaka realized that throughout Japan, large areas of land were being abandoned by farmers, the local Satoyama nature was immediately replace by aggressive invasive exotic plant and animal species. He also realized that in many places, the cemeteries were full, forcing authorities to open new cemetaries, usually destroying more native nature. So he decided to buy abandoned farmland in the heart of a rural area in Ichinoseki, Tohoku region (northern Japan) and to turn it into a new type of a cemetery. One that removes the invasive species, restores nature and buries deceased people together with indigenous plantings. The burial fee is used to create a rich forest and many different habitats, a home for numerous species considered on the edge of extinction in Japan.

Special guests: Friends Of Trees

 
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Sep
28
6:30 PM18:30

MOSSVILLE: WHEN GREAT TREES FALL

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MOSSVILLE: WHEN GREAT TREES FALL

Directed by Alexander John Glustrom

US, 1 hr 15 mins, PNW premiere

“Welcome to beautiful downtown Mossville,” Stacey Ryan says wryly. “Population: one.” Mossville, Louisiana is a shadow of its former self – a community rich in natural resources and history, founded by formerly enslaved people, where neighbors lived in harmony, insulated from the horrors of Jim Crow.  Today, however, Mossville no longer resembles the town it once was.  Surrounded by 14 petrochemical plants, Mossville is the future site of apartheid-born South African-based chemical company Sasol’s newest plant – a $21.2 billion project and the largest in the western hemisphere.

At the center of it all is a man named Stacey Ryan. 48 years old and a lifelong resident of Mossville, Ryan has lost both parents to cancer and seen the neighborhood he grew up in demolished to make way for Sasol’s new multi-billion dollar project. He experiences these changes while dwelling in a FEMA trailer formerly owned by his parents, and smack in the middle of where the new Sasol facility is being built. He is the last man standing in the way of the plant’s expansion and refusing to leave.

Screening with:

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L’EAU EST LA VIE (WATER IS LIFE): FROM STANDING ROCK TO THE SWAMP

Directed by Sam Vinal, Mutual Aid Media

US, 24 mins

On the banks of Louisiana, fierce Indigenous women are ready to fight—to stop the corporate blacksnake and preserve their way of life. They are risking everything to protect Mother Earth from the predatory fossil fuel companies that seek to poison it.


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Sep
28
9:00 PM21:00

SPEARS FROM ALL SIDES

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SPEARS FROM ALL SIDES

Directed by Christopher Walker

Ecuador & US, 1 hr 30 mins, PNW premiere

In 2013 Ecuador's President Correa announced an end to the moratorium on oil drilling in the Yasuni Park - one of the most biologically diverse regions of the world. Opening the Park - and Waorani lands - to oil drilling once again. Extensive oil drilling in Ecuador is not only further destroying the Amazon rainforest and the livelihoods of local people, but also continues our dangerous global addiction to oil - contributing to further global warming. Nowhere in the world are the battle lines on climate change and indigenous rights more sharply drawn than in the Amazon rainforest - where any destruction affects the entire planet. Filmed over 3 years, SPEARS FROM ALL SIDES reveals the progress of this new oil invasion from the intimate perspective of the Waorani people. Moving from the deep Amazon rainforest to Washington D.C. and back, it is a dramatic story of deception, brutality, betrayal, and in the end hope.

Special guests: Bark

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Sep
29
2:00 PM14:00

THE WILD

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THE WILD

Directed by Mark Titus

US, 1 hr 3 mins, Oregon premiere, PNW filmmaker

When wild salmon return to their home rivers to spawn and die, their bodies are a sacrament - giving life to their progeny, the earth itself and human beings. Their last act ensures that life will continue. Right now, it may be up to us to ensure their very existence will continue. By suddenly dismantling safeguards the EPA had enacted to protect the salmon, water and people of Bristol Bay, Alaska - the current political regime in the US has unilaterally revived a mining corporation’s relentless pursuit to build North America’s largest open-pit copper mine - directly in the headwaters of the most prodigious wild sockeye salmon run in the world.

The Wild is a race against time, where the hard-fought-for/hard-won protections for Bristol Bay now seem as fleeting as morning mist.  Fresh into addiction recovery, this urgent threat spurs filmmaker Mark Titus back to the Alaskan wilderness he loves, guided by the questions:  How do we reconcile human separation from the natural world that sustains us – and if we can change course - how do we save what remains? How do you save what you love? 

Filmmakers in attendance. Post film panel discussion followed by Virtual Reality media experience that places the viewer in Bristol Bay Alaska

Screening with:

photo: Jason Hartwick

photo: Jason Hartwick

STORIES FROM THE WATERSHED: KATE

Directed by Shane Anderson

US, 5 mins 

Kate Crump is a world renowned fly fishing guide, owner of Frigate Travel and a board member at Pacific Rivers. Kate lives and works out of Rockaway Beach, Oregon. Like so many Oregonians, weak logging laws under the Forest Practices Act have affected Kate's business and community.


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Sep
29
4:30 PM16:30

QUEEN WITHOUT LAND

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QUEEN WITHOUT LAND

Directed by Asgeri Helgestad

Norway, 1 hr 10 mins, US West Coast premiere

This is a true story about the meeting between Frost, a beautiful polar bear mother, and Asgeir Helgestad, a Norwegian wildlife filmmaker, during his four-year journey on Svalbard. Rising temperatures, are responsible for dramatic changes in Frost’s ecosystem as the ice is melting at record speed. From complete darkness to the absolute light of the midnight sun, Svalbard transforms from a cold and inhospitable place to the most joyous and lively scenery for ice algae, fish, birds and animals. But alongside these seasonal transformations, the disappearing sea ice forces life to new limits. Fjords that were once full of ice and seals, get abandoned pushing Frost further away. Asgeir is determined to find her and document all that is being lost, but his task is far from easy. This film explores the question “this planet is home to all of us, can we afford to ignore it?”

Screening with:

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GAJA BORNEO

Directed by Shervin Hess

Borneo & US, 5 mins

Inspired by real events, the story of human-elephant conflict comes to life in a stop motion world made out of recycled paper.

Film Co-Producer in attendance

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Special guests: Northwest VEG and Fur Free PDX


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Sep
29
6:30 PM18:30

AN ISLAND IN THE CONTINENT (UNA ISLA EN EL CONTINENTE)

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AN ISLAND IN THE CONTINENT (UNA ISLA EN EL CONTINENTE)

Directed by Juan Pablo Miquirray

Mexico, 1 hr 10 mins, PNW premiere

An immersive, experiential trip along the 1,300 km long Peninsula of Baja California in Mexico, a mythological and magical land. In this film, the past, present and the future are interwined to create a beautiful and unique symphony of the nature, the history and people of the Baja.  From the astounding beauty of the prehistoric Great Mural cave paintings of Cuestra Palmerito to the modern-day development and extraction plans placed on the Sierra de la Laguna biosphere reserve, Baja California is like a symphony, but it is already missing many instruments. The symphony is still lovely but if we heard the original, we would notice that it is dying. Featuring the words and writings of poet and journalist Edmundo Lizardi.

Filmmaker in attendance

 Screening with:

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THE SHEPHERDESS

Directed by Katie Falkenberg

US, 6 mins

A Navajo shepherdess perseveres in a rapidly vanishing way of life, despite extreme drought on the reservation. “We didn’t even go up the mountain because there’s no water,” she recounts. “Hardships are just lessons and challenges in life and you just can’t dwell on it, you have to live through it.”


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Sep
29
9:00 PM21:00

CONFLUENCE

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CONFLUENCE

Directed by Amy Marquis and Dana Romanoff

US, 55 mins, PNW premiere

The Colorado River has carved a deep imprint on both the physical landscape of the American Southwest, and on the people who live near its waters. Confluence follows the indie folk band, The Infamous Flapjack Affair, as they traverse this endangered river system and create original music documenting the people and places along their journey.

Screening with:

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INSTRUMENTS IN THE ARCHITECTURE: BUILDING THE PIANODROME

Directed by Austen McCowan & Will Hewitt

United Kingdom, 14 mins

Pianos are being thrown away at a tremendous rate – hauled away, set on fire and their valuable heavy metal sold for scrap. Tim, Leon and their team of inspired artists, musicians and volunteers have reclaimed these unloved instruments to build the world’s first 100-seater amphitheatre made entirely from up-cycled pianos. Balancing the artistic integrity of Tim’s vision with Leon’s practicality and realism tests the strength of their relationship as they race to complete the Pianodrome for its debut at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.


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