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FILM SHORTS: REBIRTH

Four short films about the regenerative power of nature.

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THE SOUND OF A WILD SNAIL EATING

Directed by Elisabeth Tova Bailey

US, 15 mins, PNW premiere

When a woman is bedridden by a mysterious pathogen, a forest snail unexpectedly takes up residence on her nightstand. Together, the woman and snail share an intimate journey of survival and resilience. Their captivating and graceful explorations expand the boundaries of the bedroom. Adapted from the award-winning nonfiction memoir of the same title. Featuring the voice of Daryl Hannah.

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REWILDING A MOUNTAIN

Director Trip Jennings, Producer Sara Quinn

US, 27 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmakers

The sagebrush sea is a landscape of stark beauty and captivating wildlife, yet rapid desertification and extractive industries threaten this vast basin. But at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in Southeastern Oregon, a different story unfolds. New aspen explode alongside thriving creeks, migratory birds travel thousands of miles to nest in willow branches and even the endangered sage grouse seem to be recovering in the uplands. This film unravels an unsettling controversy that challenged the core identity of the West and follows a team of scientists who ask the question: what happened here?

At a moment when public lands are under attack, fresh water is becoming increasingly scarce and climate change demands severe action, Hart Mountain may serve as a lesson deeply needed, if we’re willing to listen.

Filmmakers in attendance

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FOR AYAN

Director Zach Putnam

US, 4 mins, PNW premiere, PNW filmmaker

Farah and her family have a tree planting tradition in memory of their daughter Ayan.

Filmmaker in attendance

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BECOMING FOREST TREES

Directed by Ran Levy-Yamamori

Israel and Japan, 27 mins., US premiere

Japanese Zen Buddhist priest Genpou Chisaka has a deep love and respect for nature and is reviving native Japanese Satoyama nature through alternative burials. Chisaka realized that throughout Japan, large areas of land were being abandoned by farmers, the local Satoyama nature was immediately replace by aggressive invasive exotic plant and animal species. He also realized that in many places, the cemeteries were full, forcing authorities to open new cemetaries, usually destroying more native nature. So he decided to buy abandoned farmland in the heart of a rural area in Ichinoseki, Tohoku region (northern Japan) and to turn it into a new type of a cemetery. One that removes the invasive species, restores nature and buries deceased people together with indigenous plantings. The burial fee is used to create a rich forest and many different habitats, a home for numerous species considered on the edge of extinction in Japan.

Special guests: Friends Of Trees

 
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